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20131202
20131210
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CNNW 11
KNTV (NBC) 2
MSNBCW 2
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
at madison park high school when mandela arrived. >> mr. nelson mandela. [ cheers ] >> reporter: inside the school, pure excitement. >> you all have filled our hearts. >> reporter: this man was a student there. >> 23 years later i still remember that day as if it were yesterday. you heard about this guy in history and suddenly, you know, he's coming to your high school. it was a surreal moment. >> reporter: in detroit -- ♪ >> reporter: -- tens of thousands flocked to tiger stadium. owen beaver was in the motor city. >> i met him for the first time. i got to tell you, we embraced. >> reporter: it was a whirlwind trip. 8 cities, 12 days. stops in miami, los angeles, washington, d.c., and atlanta. >> to be so young and to meet a leader as great as mandela was a really big moment. >> reporter: this woman was just 10 years old at the time, on the tarmac in atlanta. >> i just remember looking in his face. even as young as i was, i remember thinking just what a kindness there was about him and his eyes thinking how amazing it was for somebody who had been through so much to not have a harden
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
, president reagan and u.s. policy was pro-white south africa and really, mr. mandela was on the terrorist list until july 1st, 2008, taken off by president george bush. until 2008 he was still on the terrorist list. >> he said some things that were very controversial. in 2002, mandela said as the debate about the war in iraq was beginning but before the war had launched, he said quote, if there's a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world it is the united states of america. they don't care for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948.
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
are under way following mandela's death thursday night. he was 95 years old. mr. mandela's body is being prepared now for his lying in state. that will happen late they are week. on tuesday, there will be an official memorial service, then there will be a state funeral on sunday in the village where he grew up. >>> number four, mexican police have recovered stolen radioactive material and are grilling six men who may be connected to the theft. the men tested negative for any poisoning from that material. they're now in police custody. mexican authorities say they've recovered all of the lost cobalt-60 material, but they've been tight-lipped about whether they've made any arrests in the broader case. >>> services will be held today in hawaii to mark the 72nd anniversary of the japanese attack on pearl harbor. lots of veterans and survivors are angry that the traditional missing-man flyover, you saw one there, has been cancelled this year. because of military budget constraints. >>> blockbuster jobs report for november. >> yeah. >> and it could not have come at a better time really for pre
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
, there is a response from his office, which is mr. mandela deserves to be remembered and honored for his sacrifices in pursuit of freedom, for the oppressed and his historic achievements to that end. that's from a spokeswoman, ka katherine frazier. he's aware there has been a negative response from some conservatives. he got similar not as negative, but some negative response when he supported the gillibrand amendment that had to do with sexual assault in the military, a complicated bill we can talk about at another time, but he also got brush back from conservatives on that. >> we'll watch you tackle this and other stories coming up in five minutes. i'll let you go. jake tapper on "the lead." thank you very much. >>> have you seen this video? i know you're all tweeting what happens to the video. we will tell you, next. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo,
coming your way. first, nelson mandela will be laid to rest in south africa on december 15th. president and mrs. obama will be there to pay their respects. fox's ed henry just wrapped
moments with us tonight. thank you so much. >> i thank you very much, mr. anderson cooper. thank you, god bless you. >> how awesome is she? much has been made of nelson mandela's talent. the 1995 rugby world cup, remarkable, mandela wearing the uniform of a team adored by white africaners as a symbol of apartheid. that resinated on and off the playing field. or in gary players case, the golf course. he was moved by mandela and a 1966 sports illustrated profile john under wood says he feels critics are not aware how the black natives of south africa are. there are growing children who will some day be ready for the responsibility of adulthood but in the meantime must be given guidance in christian compassion. the same year the player writes he lives in a country which is quote the product of its instinct and ability to maintain civilized values and standards amongst the alien bar barrens. the gary player today is not the gary player of 1966. we spoke earlier. >>> gary, you tell a remarkable story about the first time you met nelson mandela after he was released from prison. explain what h
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)